18.14 Corrections to several issues of the Chronicle

No 18 : 5 March 1971

3.1 “Responses in Moscow”

Item 3. The Chronicle stated: “Even before the invasion of Czechoslovakia, Czech newspapers disappeared from the bookstalls.” In fact, Czechoslovak publications were on sale without interruption right up to 21 August 1968. Their “disappearance” can be explained only by an increased demand while the number of copies offered for sale remained unchanged.

7.6 “The movement of the people from Meskhetia for a return to their homeland”

The two references to a Decree of 31 October 1956 were incorrect. They should have referred to two unpublished Decrees of 28 April 1956 and 31 October 1957.

16.2 “The Trial of Pimenov and Vail”

Makeyev is the deputy head of the department of housing and communal services [ZhKU], and not, as the Chronicle stated, the head of the department of buildings and works [ZhSU],

16.7 “Following up Reports in the Press”

Some copies of the Chronicle contained the misprint: Eduard Lalayants. This should read: Eruand (as in Chronicle 14.5).

17.2 “The trial of Valentin Moroz”

The patronymic of Valentyn Moroz is Yakovlevich. He was born in 1935. He was sentenced under Article 62, para. 2 of the Ukrainian Criminal Code (equivalent to Article 70, para. 2 of the Russian Code, i.e. he was judged to be an especially dangerous recidivist).

17.11 “Political Prisoners in the Mordovian Camps”

The patronymic of Ya. V. Odobescu is Vlasovich, not Vladimirovich.

17.12 “News in Brief”

Item 3. This report of the pardoning of Emelyanov, [Azerbaidjani] Minister of Internal Affairs under [Beria’s lieutenant] Bagirov, is open to misinterpretation. It did not refer to those “Beria men” who have been released from the camps on completing their sentences or who have died in captivity.

Item 6. See also the report on the inauguration of a monument to N. I. Vavilov in the journal Priroda (1971, No. 2, p. 62).

17.15, Supplement, part two

According to rough calculations based on a list compiled [in October 1970] by the Reform Baptists [initsiativniki], about 60 Baptists were arrested in 1969 and a further 34 in 1970.